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against the dutch state. >> for years, the news of the world, britain's top selling sunday tabloid and part of rupert murdoch of global media empire at news corp. has been dogged by claims of phone hacking. now the story has taken another twist. today, prime minister, david cameron, spoke of his shock over allegations that a mobile phone belonging to a young british girl murdered nine years ago was hacked into by a private detective working for the newspaper. >> for months, this scandal has been growing and growing as more and more celebrities and politicians aren't formed their phones had been hacked. but now, and much more serious allegation has shocked the country. a 13-year-old went missing in 2002. her body was found six months later. the latest claim is that the news of the world packed into her phone while she was missing and some messages may have been deleted in the process. david cameron, who is on a trip to afghanistan, made his feelings clear. >> if they are true, this is a truly dreadful act and a truly dreadful situation. what i read in the papers is quite, quite shoc
in britain, news corp. has made big business mistakes in america. it owns dow jones -- it bought at dow jones in 2007 and two years later it was worth $2.8 billion, less than their purchase price. myspace was bought for $580 million in 2005, sold for $35 million this year. but one of their largest shareholder still has huge confidence in the company. >> you have seen a business that has evolved, moving from newspapers and to other media, and moving more fee- based business model as opposed to advertising based. i think there is an awful lot of good steps that have been made, and i am very impressed overall with the company's success. >> rupert murdoch is back in america, more comfortable perhaps in a country where big investors still back him as the chief executive. >> here is a man, even though he is 80 years old, warren buffett is 80 years old and he is doing well, sumner redstone, and these are men with long track records of great success. to not want some of that wisdom in there, i think, would be a mistake. as will rogers said, good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes
about that. >> any other information on what his relationship with britain is? >> i do not know. it is too early in the case. i do not alloknow. >> is it true he went to liberia? can you confirm that? >> i do not know. >> how about the ways he communicated with the cells. >> i cannot comment because i don't know. it is difficult for me to answer. >> there was a fear he might send signals to those cells. that was a fear. >> did he want to read the manifesto at the initial hearing? >> yes, he wanted to read it and he read some of it for the judge. >> how much? >> maybe five minutes or something like that. >> [inaudible] at what point exactly? >> after the bombing, after the action in the island, and he also thought he would be killed at the trial. he believes someone would kill him. >> the other cells [inaudible] >> that is correct. >> [inaudible] has he said anything about that? >> he knows he is not permitted to say anything. >> [inaudible] >> it is complicated for me to answer. >> he actually surrendered to police -- can you explain why he did that? >> he was surrounded by the
, "bbc world news." >> the security transition in afghanistan -- after america, britain confirmed plans to step back from combat duties. visiting afghanistan, of princeton -- british prime minister cameron says he was confident the country will be able to look after its own security by 2014. >> as we see a stronger and more confident afghan national army, stronger police -- many of whom we trained ourselves -- and also local police, i do think it is right to start planning the withdrawal of some of our troops. welcome to "gmt." also on this program -- newspaper executives are expected to meet british police today over allocation the phones of a murdered teenage girl was attacked -- allegations. back and in fighting spirit. the venezuelan president makes a surprise return from cuba following treatment for cancer. it is midday here in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington, d.c., and mid afternoon in afghanistan where nato has confirmed the death of another four of its soldiers. they were killed in the east of the country where foreign troops, mostly american, are battling a fierce taliban insur
no evidence of that in norway or in britain. >> but for now, the focus in norway is on the dead and those missing. the police will release more names as the terrible process of identifying all have been lost goes on. james robbins, bbc news, oslo. >> and as norway continues to mourn, the country's justice minister has praised the security services for their response to friday's attack, but four days on, there are questions about whether the police were quick enough to get to the rampage. local residents were the first to organize the rescue. gavin hewitt has been talking to some of those involved. >> across from the island, where so many died, there are still people waiting, with young people still missing. what is emerging here is the story of those rescued and questions about the police response. the heart of this rescue is a camp site. the two launched their boat to help people swimming from the island, where a man dressed as a policeman was hunting their friends down. >> the first thing was, they do not trust us. "i cannot trust you." we have to make some comfort to them to say, "yes,
for britain's sky broadcasting. this comes as a criminal investigation gets under way into the phone hacking a firestorm. back to the newsroom with developments in the story. >> it is being called britain's watergate, and since rupert murdoch has a major media presence in the u.s. and worldwide, the scandal is being closely watched here in washington. >> it started with a simple royal me injury for prince william, reported in 2005 by "news of the world." that leak led to a police investigation and charges the paper hacked into the house of windsor's phone lines, but it was not until this month that the british public learned from britain's "guardian" newspaper that politicians murder victims, and many others had also been have. today, after a meeting at 10 downing street, the family of a 13-year-old murder victim says they are glad the prime minister is now launching a full investigation. the family believes their daughter might be alive if the "news of the world" reporters deleted key messages from their families phone lines. >> politicians for all three parties have liaised and reacted so
to be suspicious suggesting it was a suicide. this scandal is rocking britain but seems ready to explode here in the united states. the fbi investigating whether a news corp journalist tried to hack into the phones of 9/11 victims and survivors. calls in congress for a investigation. the fbi also says it's aware of reports that actor jude law's phone was hacked while he was in new york. the scandal shows no sign of slowing down. quite the contrary. possibly being replaced as the ceo of his own media empire. a man whose customer base is the whole world. anyone who watches "glee" or reads the "wall street journal" or anyone that goes to the movies or reads books. we have jeffrey toobin and matthew chance. and brian stelter. brian, we'll start with you, rupert murdoch stepping down in the world of media, that's a wow. true or maybe? >> right now it's a maybe. news corp will not deny the bloomberg report on the record. what they say on background, people around the company say there was no meeting today to talk about it. you can tell that's not a real denial. they may want this out here before th
, i've been involved with the television casting programs in britain. no question that does help. the fundamental thing is doesn't matter who you are or what you are that you do want to go out to some kind of live event and people like the idea. even if it's going to a restaurant. they can't just sit over their computers all day and play endless games and twitter all the time. people actually do like the thought of going to a space where they hear the reaction of other people. and they can hear, if you're part of a communal experience in the theater. >> many of your colleagues in the world of theater, you're not remotely snobbish about talent shows. you've been a judge on shows in britain. you've been a mentor to "american idol." what is your view of them? can they produce bona fide a stars, do you think? >> of course they can. the real thing which i found in britain, more difficult to do here because it's such a big country that people think it's, if i live in san francisco why would i vote for a girl who might be going to the "wizard of oz" or broadway. that's a different thing
television in britain. the business consequences of this scandal are still unfolding, but the legal consequences started unfolding years ago. in 2007, a "news of the world" editor and private investigator hired by the paper were jailed for the phone hacking. the editor, andy coulson denied knowing about the hacking but resigned anyway. david cameron then hired that editor, andy coulson, to be a communications director for them. last week he and another editor were arrested for hacking and bribery charges. told about the involvement in the scandal at the time cameron was hiring him. cameron announced an official inquiry. >> after listening carefully, we've decided the best way to proceed is with one inquiry, but in two parts. i can tell the house this inquiry will be led by one of the most senior judges in this country and under the 2005 inquiries act. newspaper reporters, management, pro -- barbara boxer, jay rockefeller and bob menendez have all called for investigations by the justice department and securities and exchange commission. the senators say they want to know if american
>> welcome to our program. we begin with the prime minister of great britain, david cameron, answering questions in the house of commons. we have an assessment from lionel barber, the editor of the "financial times," and london bureau chief, catherine mayer. >> it came up in yesterday's hearing, and it's willful blindness. that is to say those people who should have known but didn't ask the right questions, for whatever motive. that is the question that mrs. brooks has to answer. >> we continue this evening with the incredible story of one of the richest women in china, zhang xin. >> from the outside, i hear friends talk about the rise of china, the politicians knowing what they do. in fact, someone mo who ves, works in china, a different picture. chinese are complaining about the government. the government seems to be rolling out of the policies, and managing the everyday problems. and in terms of theconfence ofecoming a superpower, i see -- i just don't see that. >> we conclude this evening with investigative reporter and author ahony somers. he's written a book called "th
"atlantis," the final launch of the nasa shuttle program. >> brown: britain's "news of the world" scandal expands, and ray suarez explores its impact on both journalism and politics. >> lehrer: tom bearden has the latest on the exxon pipeline rupture that gushed thousands of gallons of crude oil into a montana river. >> it's been a week since the silver tip pipeline released oil into the yellowstone river. but it may be months before they know how much damage is actually been done. >> brown: and david brooks and ruth marcus analyze the week's news. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our future depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it's all about investing in the future. >> we can find new energy-- more cleaner, safer and smarter. >> collaborating with the best in the field. >> chevron works with the smartest people at leading universities and tech companies. >> and yet, it's really basic. >> it's paying off every day. the william a
will continue into great britain. this a major setback, though, for the rupert murdoch empire, though you heard richard quest saying perhaps, perhaps he sees money to be made here. that's all for right now. hope to see you back tomorrow night. "in the arena" starts right now. >>> good evening. welcome to the program. i'm tom foreman. shock waves are rolling through the media world tonight over what looks like a criminal enterprise operating inside of a newsroom. high-profile figures targeted for a gangster style roundup, and all of it taking place under the leadership of one of the richest and most powerful men in america. it sounds like a hollywood thriller, but this is real life, it's playing out in london, and sending tremors all the way to american shores. rupert murdoch, the owner of fox news, 20th century fox, the "new york post," and a number of other vast media powerhouses is under fire tonight, hours after he took the dramatic step of abruptly closing down one of his biggest tabloid newspapers. it is called "the news of the world," and it is at the center of a scandal that just keeps g
and killing -- 30 countries including the u.s., france, and britain has recognized -- have recognized the rebels. with gaddafi still firmly entrenched despite months of bombing, the anti-government forces have stepped up their offenses in western libya. >> heavy fighting continues in western libya. the rebels have waged a five- month campaign aimed at capturing tripoli. gaddafi forces have proved a formidable opponent. the government has received support from the global community. the international contact group has given its full support to libya's transitional council, recommended the formation of an interim government. they have also asked that gaddafi relinquished power. -- gaddafi relinquish power. >> there are no other options. >> it is an important diplomatic milestone for the libyan opposition, especially now that the u.s. has officially recognized the rebel movement. >> we still have to work through various legal issues. we expect this recognition will enable the tnc to access additional sources of funding. >> there has been much to service demands for political and financial
control as there is flu fallout from britain's phone hacking scandal threatening his media empire. >> media mogul rupert murdoch faced a mob of reporters as he met with his em battled c.e.o. rebecca brooks in london. british police will question her later this week about the phone hacking coverup that happened on her watch. cameras caught murdoch reading sunday's final edition of the "news of the world." the paper ended a 168-year run after news broke that journalists were hacking into phones of murder and terrorism victims for stories. >> there will have to be some kind of massive clearout of the stables really. it just looks terrible. >> london's daily mirror tabloid is hitting murdoch with more claims of corruption involving 9/11 victims. the paper quotes an ex-new york city cop saying news of the world reporters offered to pay him for phone records of the dead. the phone hacking scandal boiled over last week with the case of millie doweller, a british teen murdered in 2002. her parents met with britain's deputy prime minister monday. police say journalists from news of the wor
. >> just ahead, in london, britain prime minister defends his record and his staff after hugh granted wins a legal victory involving a tabloid. >> up next, you'll never believe what a new survey uncovered about disabled parking placards issued by california. (s(speaking g in internanational language) and he said un tm go ye into all of the world and preach the gospel preach the gospel  ♪very creature in the world. (applause) >>> investor carl icahn is raising his offer for clorox. it's now $10.7 billion or $80 a share that is more than his initial bid. the first bid was rejected a couple days ago. i con says he believes shareholders should decide whether to accept the offer. clorox acknowledged they got an offer and reviewing it. >> the department of motor vehicles says 60,000 of more than 2 million disabled parking placards may be sent to dead people. they conduct records every two years and it misses many of those people. overall one-third placards are being used illegally. >>> the latest rounds of debt talks are set to begin at the nation's capital in less than an hour. p
more than 1000 train carriages in britain. >> of the contract is part of the plan to upgrade the rail lines. the consortium won the final better. the contract calls for the construction of 1200 train carriages. ththe deal is worth a total of about 4 billion euros. the first carriages are delivered in 2015. the transport minister says it represents the best value for tax payers. the product rule create 2000 new jobs in the u.k. operations and three of the supply chain. >> have posted rerd half your sales. selling more than 660,000 vehicles a between january and june. an increase of almost 10%. sales were fueled by china, india, and russia. sales actlly dropped in germany, but they expect strong growth in the second half of the year had it is on drive to achieve a sales record of 1.3 million vehicles this year. the stock market shrugged off the weaker than domestic sales data. our correspondent who says the summary of trading from the frankfurt stock exchange. >> they spilled water into the wine, but overall, investors have been content with the numbers. the have been a few gainers here
for joining us. now to the hacking scandal which continues in britain. but those even further. after gordon brown claimed in an interview that the "sunday times" also part of the murdoch empire hire criminals to obtain the information. there is some flash photography. >> here is gordon that downing street with rupert's starter next to him and the top editor on the right. for years, team brown stayed close to t murdoch. no more. peace miles fell away. gordon brown accused them and their newspaper of using criminals to investigate his private life. >> some were getting information from my lawyers. like a tax attorney said that medical records have been broken into. i do not tell how all of this happened. in two instances, there is absolute proof that news international, was involved in hiring people to get this information. ith people that the work wa our criminals. >> this is the editor of "the sunday times." in a statement tonight, they believe ethanol law was broken, no criminal was used edie story was published giving both sides of the hearing. he attacked the way it reported that his you
islamic law is compatible with britain's christian heritage and value. last month, cox, introduced a bill in the house of law. >> in britain we have a country where many people have died to protect democratic freedom. we now have a law an alternative to develop in our land which is fundamentally incompatible with democratic freedom. many citizens, especially women, are suffering as a result. >> reporter: the head of the communication might judge the latest announcement is proof that they are seeking to propose it. >> they want to propose sharia law on the community and that's precisely why we're backing the bail house of law. it's going to ensure there's a quality before the law. >> reporter: this proposal may seen unlikely, christians say it force them to stand against increasing islamic influence in their nation. cbn news, brad ford england. >>> coming up christians in japan praying for a spiritual awakening. why they believe god is using disasters to draw people to him. >> welcome back. christians in japan struggling to share the gospel. however the recent disasters are causing
will compete, but >>> euro fighter has been ordered by its four partner nations, britain, germy, britain and spain. but india is seen as critical to keep production going. we caught up with enzo cazellini at the air show. >> congratulations with india where you were chosen for the fighter competition. i want to start by asking you, how do you expect to win. how do you expect to beat euro. >> let me start by saying that we're going to -- we have cooperation with india and france. we know india, we know the country and we believe that india can make boosts from the political level and continue this full type of click collaboration with spain. >> reporter: and do you feel you have a stronger industrial cooperation package as well. >> we have also very strong cooperation. we believe that all together we can offer much more attractive situation for the future development of india industry. >> reporter: of the whole order of aircraft about 130 aircraft or so, 18 of them are supposed to be built in europe in existing factories but the rest coproduced with hanestan in india. but hanesta had some
. the fall of scotland yard? britain's beacon of law and order, rocked by allegations of bribery. top brass resigning in disgrace, and today, a stunning breach of security. time to call in sherlock holmes? >>> and death of a whistle blower. sean hoare lived the tabloid life to the limit. drugs, booze, and cell phones. that's how he got his sensati sensational stories. looks like he saved the best one for last. >>> then, news corp. and politicians, we've seen the cozy connection in britain, but here in america, for political contributions, you'll never guess who gets the most murdoch money. >>> back now to our in-depth report, the murdoch hacking scandal and a key question, how deeply involved were the police and exactly why did they shut down their original phone hacking investigation back in 2007? my guests tonight worked with murdoch as senior editor for the times of london and has insider's knowledge of the close or perhaps too close relationship between the police and the tabloids. welcome, nicholas waptchak. i want to get to the hearing, but this was fascinating to watch. >> i can't th
, there are questions about the cozy relationship between the police come and media, and politicians in britain. >> i am the first prime minister to publish meetings between senior executives, private tears -- proprietors. this stretches right back to the general election. >> it was his decision to fire the former "news of the world," editor andy coulson that is drawing the most criticism. there are questions about whether andy coulson knew about the illegal activity on his watch. >> he was caught in a tragic conflict of loyalty between the standards and integrity that people should expect of him and his staff and his personal allegiance to andy coulson. he made the wrong choice. >> you don't make decisions in hindsight, you make them in the present. you live and you learn and to believe you me, i have learned. >> the labor leader pointed out that downing street had been warned over andy coulson's past. the opposition also alleges that cameron has met 26 times with representatives from murdoch's companies since taking office. >> let's get the continuing impact of this whole scandal on rupert murdoch's e
. international response has been mixed. britain has given 23 million accounts. the united states early have five. germany and france are among those accused of ignoring alarm bells. >> they have been dangerously inadequate. britain is setting a good lead, and we expect others to contribute. there are signs others are beginning to put things away, because we need that to happen rapidly. >> money is not the only problem. the famine has taken control in areas controlled or influenced militant islamists. now they say a ban has been lifted, but politics are complicated and aid is not getting to the right people fast enough. so the familiar images of hunger and the predictable scramble for money and resources. >> for more on efforts to assist those suffering from drought, i am joined by the deputy assistant secretary for refugees and migration. you have just returned from the refugee camps of eastern africa. tell us what you saw. >> i have been too many refugee camps across the world. i can tell you is among the worst i have ever seen. the rate coming into the camps is very high. it is 1300 a day into
? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> base scandal claims its latest. -- the scandal claims its latest in britain. who will be next as more come under scrutiny? >> welcome to "gmt." the united states top commander in afghanistan hands over control and is now going to be in charge of the cia. germany wins the women's world cup. it is 7:00 a.m. in washington. midday here in london. this is where the scandal surrounding the news of the world continues. the british prime minister insists that his decision to hire a former executive from the newspaper is quite different. citizens step down after being criticized for employing the newspaper's former deputy editor. richard has the latest developments. >> the country's most senior police officer is the latest and most high-profile casualty of the scandal. he became personally involved after this man was arrested a few days ago. a former editor @ "the news of the world close " -- news of the world close " who went on to work for the police. >> i played no role in the management of that contract. we must have suspected the alleged involvement and let me sa
wife pleaded guilty and goes to prison. >>> the final copy of britain oppose the biggest tabloid hit the newsstands. the news of the world's issued a full-page apology. its owner rupert murdoch is in london trying to handle the crisis around his media empire. the sunday times reports more arrests are expected over the telephones hacking scandal. >>> nasa is word a piece of space junk may, close to atlantis and the international space station. the space junk is expected to make its closest approach on tuesday as the astronauts will be conducting a spacewalk. the shuttle crew will spend the next week on loading 7,000 pounds of equipment and supplies for the international space station. >>> will and kate's no american tour is over. how was your first trip to the u.s.? >> thank you very much. >> after spending nine days in canada, they wrapped up their three-day stay in california. they visited zero in los angeles and then an inner-city academy of arts and participated in a polo match. then they stopped at a jobs fair for america -- for unemployed veterans. >> this is the last stop on ou
on. >> default, get it over with. >> we came up celebrating great britain. but next, a new book at how britain played a crucial role in the american civil war. stay with us. we'll have that with more "morning joe." ♪♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ look at that car, well, it goes fast ♪ ♪ givin' my dad a heart attack ♪ [ friend ] that is so awesome. ♪ i love my car [ engine revving ] [ male announcer ] that first chevy, yea, it gets under your skin. ♪ >>> 40 past the hour. welcome back to "morning joe." joining us, award-winning historian and internationally best-selling author, amanda foreman. she's out now with a new book, "a world on fire." britain's crucial role in the american civil war. i love the back story. what a woman. today's woman. it took her ten years to write this book? >> ten years. she had five kids along the way. >> that's busy. >> that's impressive. >> to say the least. >> got in the book a tad bit. >> tell us about the book that has an amazing cast of characters. >> 197 characters, mostly men. system of the women are so great that they stand out. my favorite is th
are swept up in britain's phone hacking scandal. >>> concert chaos, thousands run for safety when a stage collapses. in ottawa. >>> and in hiding, casey anthony gets out of jail and out of sight. captioning funded by cbs >>> and good morning, everyone. appreciate you joining us. i'm terrell brown in for betty nguyen. it's turning into the scandal that just won't quit. the voice mail hacking and police bribery investigation that's rocked england is snowballing. the latest this morning, britain's top police official, the head of scotland yard, has resigned, and the well-connected former chief executive of rupert murdoch's news international has been arrested. elizabeth palmer rorz. >> reporter: rebekah brooks had willingly made an appointment to go to the police station to answer questions when she arrived, she was arrested. anything she tells detectives now will become a formal part of the criminal inquiry into phone hacking and bribery of the "news of the world." brooks' arrest came as a surprise, but this was a shock. >> i have this afternoon informed the palace, secretary and the mayor
. thank you, ashley. >>> just ahead on "the morning news" a cell phone hacking scandal grows in britain. >>> plus this looks something from "the mummy" but it's not the sahara, but it's actually arizona. >>> first scott pelley has a preview of tonight's "cbs evening news." >>> they helped win the race to space but now they're losing their jobs. the end of a career for nasa workers from astronauts to mechanics. where do they go from here? find out tonight on the "cbs evening news." >>> "cbs moneywatch" sponsored by vagisil, introducing vagisil wash with odor block, the confident clean. l, introducing vagisil wash with odor block, the confident clean. as i get older, i'm making changes to support my metabolism. i'm more active, i eat right, and i switched to one a day women's active metabolism, a complete women's multivitamin, plus more -- for metabolism support. and that's a change i feel good about. [ female announcer ] from one a day. [ dramatic soundtrack plays ] whoa! man: what is that? i don't know, but it burns! it's like fire. woman: ow, ow! i can't see. man: it's singeing me! it'
two front page side by side lengthy stories about something going on in britain. to do that otherwise, you would need the queen to abdicate and the plague to hit london. clearly there's a political agenda at work here. >> the testimony from the murdoches and the testimony from rebecca brooks, coverage as we said, both, here in the states and of course in the u.k. all the cable news networks on fox, on it in its entirety, no commercial breaks. do you think that the coverage was warranted, was it fair? >> was the coverage important in that it's the most important thing going on in the world, it's not. rupert murdoch and a lot of people have a lot of interest in it, yes. people want to see is this the thing that takes rupert murdoch down and you see this idea that somehow they're going to prove something that happened in this one isolated incident is actually happening everywhere else. that's what the coverage is really about, i think, is trying to blow it into something more than what it actually was. >> jon: jim, a lot of people out there would have loved to have seen some sort of a go
yesterday and 46,000 troops remain in iraq and scheduled to depart by the end of this year. >>> britain's defunct "news of the world" it's reported may have hacked into 9/11 victims. "news of the world" reporters said they would pay him to get the numbers of 9/11 victims, he declined. the last paper rolled off the presses yesterday, brought down by a growing hacking scandal. rue bert murdoch, the paper's owner, is deep in damage control. >> reporter: rupert murdoch arrived in london, conspicuously reading a copy of his notorious cameras, then smiled for the cameras as he went out for dinner with rebekah brooks his embattled ceo. the scandal has cost him one of his most profitable papers. staff leaving "news of the world" for the last time put a brave face on the murdoch decision to shut it down. the "news of the world" was the best selling newspaper in britain, a cheeky blend of skin, scandal and gotcha journalism, for people who loved seeing the rich and powerful taken down a rich or two, but not families touched by grief. the "news of the world" is under police investigation for hacki
about greece because his plan is to make britain like greece. [shouting] what the whole country would have noticed is at a time when the economy is the key issue he can't talk about the economy because of his ludicrous plan for tax cuts. that's what we see. week after week. he has to talk about the microbe because he can't talk about the macro. >> we are very grateful. >> order, order. order, order. order. i appeal to the house to calm down and reflect on what republic thinks. >> with the prime minister -- [inaudible] spirit by honorable fred has been an extremely good point and i hope it's an order, mr. speaker, to talk about labour's record in wales. because that is a torture talk about labour's record in wales because what we're seeing if anybody wants to know, what would happen to the nhs under labour, they can look at wales where they are flushing the nhs budget and they are seeing more people waiting for longer that is what happens when you have a labour party running the nhs. >> the leader of the opposition helped create 300 more jobs earlier this year. but today because of his
in britain have feared and loathed the tabloioifor years. case in point? remember when sarah ferguson was caught selling access to prince andrew? >> 500,000 pounds when you can, to me -- open doors. >> reporter: and this headline. when prince harry angerer his girlfriend by visiting a strip club. how did the paper know? they'ves dropped on the prince's voicemail. >> you have to get the story at all costs. you go and do anything. >> reporter: even breaking the law? >> absolutely breaking the law. >> reporter: at least symbolically here in britain, it is the queen that prime ministers report to. what this scandal is up pressed for so long is revealing, is that rupert murdoch is the one who's really had their ear. every prime minister here for the last 30 years has needed the endorsement of murdoch and his media empire to win election. >> i think it's reasonable for any of us to observe that the murdoch corporatiti has too much power. >> reporter: outside "the news of the world" offices today, some celebrated the paper's downfall with a criminal investigation under way, many more could g
commission in britain. the justice department in this country is investigating whether the murdoch empire broke the law. you're watching "hardball" only on msnbc. every patient's past. and because the whole hospital's working together, there's a family who can breathe easy, right now. somewhere in america, we've already answered some of the nation's toughest healthcare questions. and the over 60,000 people of siemens are ready to do it again. siemens. answers. >>> texas governor rick perry still deciding whether to run for president. a couple of new polls also show him closing out mitt romney. take a look at this poll. perry is polling strong among republican men. we'll be right back to "hardball." as a home, there are things i'm supposed to do. like, keep one of these over your head. well, i wasn't "supposed" to need flood insurance, but i have it. fred over here chose not to have it. ♪ me, i've got a plan. fred he uh... fred what is your plan? do i look like i have a plan? not really. [ female announcer ] only flood insurance covers floods. for a free brochure, call the number on your
debt deadline? >>> stop the presse after 168 years, the final edition of britain's news of the world hits newsstands today and bids farewell to its readers. this as the investigation into the paper's expanding phone hacking scandal continues. >>> hollywood royalty. william and kate take the polo ground by day and red carpet by night. all the details of their final star-studded night in america as we bid farewell to the future king and queen today sunday, we bid farewell to the future king and queen today sunday, june 10th, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good morning, everyone. welcome to "today" on a sunday. i'm lester holt. >> i'm jenna wolfe. not bad for a first trip to america. you got some polo, some red carpet, some celebrities, probably some free food, we should all be so lucky. >> probably got one of those great travel discount sites. >> i'm sure that is what it was. >> i hope they got some down time, though. southern california is a great place to just hang. >> they only had a couple days. there were a couple other states they visited. hopefully next
is very much in britain. >> there's no shortage of people in the american media establishment and the american political establishment who have taken issue with the fact that the properties, fox news and the "new york post" have done business. that said, we've got to be careful. usually you don't want to get ahead of yourselves. in this one the story has each time surpassed your wildest expectations in the past two weeks. >> happened again this morning. >> absolutely right. i would say in terms of the american implications there's a question of whether british journalists for news corp broke the law here in 9/11. the evidence is scant. if the attorney general were to issue a wider ranging investigations, even actions that were illegal taken, for example, in great britain could reflect on the ability of news corp to hold on to american broadcasting licenses here. you could see repercussions under the question of the they interpreted as foreign officials being bribed as has been alleged with some substantive hearings. >> once you start an investigation, your don't know what kind
-cutting bill aimed at averting default today, while in britain thousands of public sector workers went on strike rallying against pension reforms. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> warner: and i'm margaret warner. on the "newshour" tonight, we look at whether austerity measures can work to spur economic growth and help solve the european debt crisis. >> brown: then, we have a newsmaker interview with white house chief of staff bill daley about the stalled debt talks, a day after the president scolded congress. >> warner: betty ann bowser reports on a colorado hospital where medical mistakes are rare. >> one in three americans are at risk of a hospital acquired infection or will become a victim of a medical error. this hospital in denver is doing something about that. >> brown: ray suarez explores the prospect of another tech bubble. this time from social media websites. >> warner: and we get a rare view of dissent in china, following a new surge of protests by young people and labor union members. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour
, for example. but in great britain, this reaches a whole other level. in a moment, i'll be talking about all of this with a couple of keen observers. but first, a look at some of the other stories i'll be drilling down on tonight. >>> obama under fire. they say he's too quick to cave, and that's the democrats talking. >> do not consider social security a piggy bank for giving tax cuts to the wealthiest people in our country. >>> and the last shuttle flight, as it roars into space, it leaves behind one small american town and a love affair 30 years in the making. >>> then, he's conducted over 40,000 interview interviews, on first-name basis with everybody, including a wizard named harry. that rhymes with larry. e.d. hill talks with the king, live. >>> we have so much going on tonight. but let's get back to our top story first, because it's impossible to overstate the impact of this. this is the most widely read english newspaper on the planet, and it's under the leadership of an american media tycoon, and now it is publishing its last page on sunday, going out of business after more than a ce
of great britain on his arm, and then the ambassador would come with the president's hostess on his arm, a wife if there was a wife. jefferson had the rule: he who is next to the door goes in first. this created a diplomatic flap because the ambassador of great britain was just outraged at this. c-span: again, you--you're writing about people who were born between 1776 and 1800. >> guest: yes. c-span: so the focus--the years that you're really focused of them being old enough to be involved, would be what? >> guest: well, i would say really the first three decades of the 19th century. c-span: 1800 to 1830? >> guest: mm-hmm. mm-hmm. i have material on the 1790s because it's a very tumultuous decade and it's important, and there are some of them who, by that time, are in their 20s. but, yes, most of the action. c-span: give us a profile on what the united states looked like in those 30 years: people, where they had come from, what their religion was. >> guest: well, to give a profile of a country that was as rambunctious as american society in those decades is going to be very hard. i can
programs in britain. no question that does help. but the fundamental thing is that it doesn't matter who you are, what you are, that you do want to go out to some kind of live event and people like the idea. they can't sit in front of their computers and play games and twitter all the time. people actually do like the thought of going to a space where they hear the reaction of other people and they can hear -- you're part of a communal experience in the theater. >> how about many of your colleagues in the theater. you're not snobbish about talent shows. you've been a judge on shows. you've been a mentor on "american idol". can they produce bona fide stars? >> yes, they can. and the real thing which i found in britain, more difficult to do here, of course, because it's such a big country, people think it's odd why if i live in san francisco vote for a girl who might be going to the "wizard of oz" on broadway. kids were coming from background where they couldn't see me in an audition. >> you saw that on "american idol" when you mentored that as well. you would see these kids that come from
of parliament in britain tomorrow, how serious is this moment for him and his company? >> it's dreadfully serious for rupert murdoch, his family and his company. the company itself i don't think is in jeopardy. it's the second or third largest media company in the world, but murdoch's aura of invincibility is gone. his lieutenants are apples falling from the tree. his argument it was a few rotten apples is discredited. it's really a barrel problem. he has to deal with that, and he knows in coming days, not just in his testimony tomorrow, but in coming days, there will be more apples that will be revealed to have been rotten. he has a lot to answer for. >> i can say from my experience, editing a newspaper for him and this was, five, six years before any of this phone hacking began, but certainly when i worked for him, he wanted his editors toagl of the things would you expect from a tabloid newspaper, but always to operate within the law. and i find it impossible, personally knowing the man, to think he would have known about law breaking on his newspapers, let alone condone it. >> it's no
of his body guards shot him. we'll bring you more information when we have it. >>> britain's former prime minister gordon brown is the latest victim of phone hacking. the sun and sunday times improperly obtained personal information like bank and medical records on his family. two senior police officers will be grilled by a committee of mps why they didn't investigate phone hacking claims earlier. >>> u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton has criticized syria for failing to protect embassies after pro-government demonstrators broke windows and spray painted walls. no one managed to get into the building. >>> divers are still searching for victims of a deadly boat disaster. the boat was overloaded, not licensed to carry passengers when it sank on sunday. president dmitry medvedev ordered an investigation. >>> u.s. president barack obama is meeting with lawmakers for another round of debt talks on tuesday. the debate stalled over how to slash the deficit and raise the debt ceiling before the u.s. defaults. republicans want spending cuts but democrats support tax hikes and neither side wan
foreign minister, prime minister of israel, and the deputy undersecretary of state for great britain signed a secret protocol providing that israeli troops would invade the sinai peninsula on october 29th. this was the plan. once the israelis advanced toward the canal zone britain and france would issue an ultimatum to israel and egypt to cease fighting and except anglo-french occupation of the canals on if, as expected, egypt rejected the ultimatum britain and france would begin bombardment of egypt on october 301st followed by a troop landings. remember, this was a secret. it was not in the newspapers to read what was in the newspapers that day was that the soviet union had sent troops into budapest, hungary, killing dozens of protesters. eisenhower knew nothing of the secret meeting in paris. that day intelligence advisory committee chaired by cia director allen dulles, the brother of john foster dulles, assumed that war was not imminent and postpone the for the revision of the intelligence estimate. the committee ignored an fbi report that an unnamed country was considering milit
and connie britain, also up for honors "modern family" led the pack among comedies, including best comedy. also in the chase for that award are the "big bang cheetheory" "" "the office" "30 rock" and "parks and recreation". steve car rel has yet to win an award. among his competitors, matt le blank in his comedy "episodes." marc barger, nbc news. >>> the buzz is building for something that rock and roll hasn't seen in a long time. the super group. >> yeah, the group, this band is called super heavy. mick jagger, dave stewart, josh stone, ar raman who won oscars. the first cast of characters that formed the band, rock, regular reggae, pop and soul. a tour is due out this september. >> can't wait to hear it. >>> coming up on news4, a scientific break through that's giving dentists and their patients a reason to smile. >>> and why this man is wearing a pasta strainer on his driver's license photo. the answer is coming up. >>> and for all of your news, be sure to follow news4 online. just search nbc was noirm now, this is more like it. >> yeah. >> just want it to hang on, right? at least for
of other countries and britain had to take on some of that and do it directly and do it very well. the town itself is going to be one of the first places in afghanistan to transition. is imminent already today that security is provided by afghans for afghans. having been there many times, i find that fact pretty staggering and encouraging and you should too. >> given that the raw material, high proportion of illegal drugs on britain streets starts in afghanistan at progress is being made in getting farmers to grow other things other than poppy and is the prime minister confident the afghan government will continue this work once we left? >> we are seeing progress on this. britain is invested in the wheat seed distribution project. one of the lessons of going to e country repeatedly in the last five years is if you want to doomething about poppy cultivation you can talk all you like about destroying crops. the real key is building roads because you have got to enable the afghans to get their produce toarket. if they don't have legitimate produce to get to legitimate market the drug dealers w
murdoch's newspapers in great britain now face their own accusations of appallinging wrong doing. their report target no less than the royal family and a former prime minister. in fact, gordon brown says the paper had links to criminals in order to hack into his bank accounts. and the medical records of his seriously ill son. meanwhile, members of parliament are demanding tough answers from police. how do they not uncover a hacking conspiracy that could mushroom to thousands of victims? let's get the latest from rivers live in london. they are asking murdoch and his son to testify? >> reporter: yeah. i mean, this is a pretty incredible development, inevitable, perhaps given the huge fury about the whole scandal. ruppert and rebecca brooks have been asked to appear before what is a select committee here which is a cross-party committee of members of parliament and can question people about a particular issue. the police involved in the current inquiry and in past inquiries have been questioned by a similar committee this morning. it's a pretty ferocious grilling that they get here
down a tabloid? now it is reaching britain's prime minister. >> the decision to hire them was mine and mine alone and i take full responsibility for it. >> this is the man he's talking about, david cameron's former press secretary arrested today. we'll tell you why coming up. >>> and the duke and duchess of cambridge ready for their close-up in america. and the paparazzi are ready for them. we're back in a moment. two hours to whiten. ♪ crest whitestrips two hour express. in just two hours you can have a noticeably whiter smile that lasts for months. ♪ hi. hi. where you guys headed? i think we're here. [ female announcer ] whitening without the wait. 3d white two hour express whitestrips...from crest. life opens up when you do. and try 3d white toothpaste and rinse. twenty-five thousand mornings, give or take, is all we humans get. we spend them on treadmills. we spend them in traffic. and if we get lucky, really lucky, it dawns on us to go spend them in a world where a simple sunrise can still be magic. twenty-five thousand mornings. make sure some of them are pure michigan. y
outrage over private information that found its way into rupert murdoch's newspapers in britain. let me say for the record that journalists are supposed to dig up information and just because somebody considers something private doesn't necessarily mean it's not newsworthy. but the murdoch scandal centers on alleged illegal phone hacks and bribes to police to get phone numbers, voice mails and documents from literally thousands of celebrities, politicians, members of the royal family, even murder victims. it's cnn's in-depth story of the week. today, former british prime minister gordon brown says murdoch papers got hold of his family's bank records. here's what brown told the bbc. >> i think what happened pretty early on in government is that the "sunday times" appeared to have got access to my building society account, they got access to my legal files, there's some question mark about what happened to other files, documentation, tax and everything else, but i'm shocked, i'm genuinely shocked to find that this happened because of their links with criminals. >> brown's predecessor refl
murdoch's media empire. the message is clear, both the u.s. and great britain are turning up the heat. >>> in china, a section of bridge collapses. sending a tourist bus plunging into the forest below and the death toll could get higher. >>> clock is ticking and tensions are soaring and if you want an idea how things heat are over the debt crisis, listen to this. president obama storms out of yesterday's meeting vowing he will veto any extension of the debt ceiling that is only short term. reports say he said to aeric cantor, quote, many could bring down my presidency. >>> the august 2nd deadline is looming and pessimism is growing. a major rating agency says it will review the nation' sterling bond rating for a possible downgrade. we are covering the angles of this all-important debt talk story. dan lothian at the white house with reaction to the extraordinary ratcheting up of tensions. ali velshi is giving us the bottom line on the economics. why should you care that u.s. bonds could face a brutal reality check? ali, let's start with you. a downgrade would be like seeing your person
-term agreement. >> ifill: now, britain's prime minister takes on his critics in the phone hacking scandal. david cameron faced questions today about hiring a former tabloid editor who's since resigned and been arrested and about rupert murdoch's aborted bid for b-sky-b-- british sky broadcasting. we start with a report from gary gibbon of "independent television news." >> reporter: rupert murdoch flew the prime minister postponed parliament's summer break by a day to try to re-establish his own standing with a statement and debate. after two weeks of resisting pressure for a full-scale apology for hiring andy coulson david cameron edged towards one and he said people would hear the full genuine article if andy coulson was found to have lied. >> i have an old fashioned view about innocent until proven guilty. but if it turns out i've been lied to that would be a moment for a profound apology. and in that event i can tell you i will not fall short. people will of course make judgements about it. of course i regret and i am extremely sorry about the furore it has caused with 20/20 hindsight and all
business in britain would be... would have been utterly beleaguered. it was he back in '86 that allowed newspaper innovation to come in. he took the "times" tabloid, everybody said he was crazy. this is a guy, for better or worse, who loves newspapers. and the "times" of london has been building up its foreign bureaus at a time. i mean, the "washington post" here is down to a handful. "chicago tribune" has known. he's been building up the foreign bureaus. he's had the courage to put up a pay wall and say "you've got to pay for what journalists do online." i wanted to point out that... ande's had tremendous courage in the very bold investments he's made. i spent along time with h 20 years ago when he was just embarking on sky b and fox here in the u.s. i don't like fox,ut to break theriopoly of the networks was an exaordinarily business achievement. now, fox's contribution to the situatioin the u.s. today is very damaging, i thin but as a bhed media executive, he has been the visionary, along with turner, i would say, of the last 20 to 30 years. >> rose: certainly in a global way. >> yea
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